A land carved by glaciers, Wales is blessed with gorgeous mountains and valleys, many that have given birth to stunning waterfalls.

Are you a hiker or an outdoor enthusiast who’s looking for a perfect weekend or a day out? Then head to the land of cascades.

In fact the Vale of Neath in Wales has been nicknamed ‘Waterfall Country’ because of just how many accessible waterfalls there are.

Some of the waterfalls in Wales are very well-known but we’ve also found a few well-hidden gems while exploring this lovely country.

Now we’ve decided to share with you the 12 waterfalls in Wales that we think you have to visit in your lifetime. Just think of it as our good deed for the day.

The 12 best waterfalls in Wales

Llanberis Falls

Located in North Wales, this dramatic waterfall is absolutely stunning. It froths, foams and falls for 30 meters as it makes its way down a tree-lined gorge.

If you visit Llanberis Falls after a day of heavy rain, the thunder of the water rushing down is immense.

Also known as “the waterfall of the great ravine”, this cascade has a large pool at the bottom which daring locals sometimes swim in. The water is very cold, but it’s a refreshing swim in beautiful surroundings.

The waterfall is situated in Snowdonia National Park, and can be reached by a short 20 minute trek from Llanberis. You can see a printable map of the trail here. (Related: Camping in Snowdonia).

Sgwd yr Eira

This beautiful waterfall – which translates as ‘river of snow’ in Welsh – is set in the stunning Brecon Beacons. One of our favourite areas of the UK. (Related: Camping in the Brecon Beacons).

Sgwd yr Eira can be reached by a trail that, while steep in places, should be accessible for anyone with a good level of fitness.

The reward is the chance to take a dip in the pool below the waterfall and swim in some of the freshest water in Wales. You can also walk directly behind the waterfall.

If you have a few hours to spare, then this is one of four waterfalls in the ‘Four Waterfalls Walk’. That trail is around six miles in length and should take around 3-4 hours. You can see a detailed description of the walk here.

Devil’s Bridge Falls

Devil’s Bridge Falls attracts tourists from all over the UK – no wonder too. This cascade in the heart of the Cambrian Mountains is made up of five waterfalls that are a combined 91 meters in height.

In fact renowned poet William Wordsworth knew this waterfall well, and once mentioned it as the “Torrent at the Devil’s Bridge”.

The name of the waterfall comes from Welsh mythology. According to legend, the tiny narrow bridge across the gorge here was built by the devil in an effort to gain the first soul who crossed it. However he was outwitted by a local woman who tossed some bread across the bridge so her dog crossed over it first. The devil, angry that the woman had made the dog cross first, vanished into thin air.

The waterfall itself is set in ancient Welsh forest and we recommend walking the ‘long nature trail’, which takes you to the waterfall, all three bridges, and to ‘Robbers Cave’ – a place where thieves used to hide centuries ago. You can see information about the trail here.

Sgwd Gwladys

If you’re looking for a magical experience then Sgwd Gwlady is the perfect place to visit. Why? Well visitors to this waterfall can walk directly behind the curtain of water!

The 10 metre high fall is hidden within a natural shady woodland amphitheatre, and it’s possible to walk along a rock edge behind the fall and get right behind the gushing water.

This falls is part of the River Mellte, and there are several other waterfalls up and downstream the river. All part of the so-called ‘Waterfall Country’.

Watkin Path Waterfalls

The Watkins Path in Snowdonia is used by ambitious walkers, but if you’re chasing waterfalls this is a must-do hike too.

That’s because this path – which goes up Wales’ highest mountain – is strewn with waterfall after waterfall, many that have gorgeous natural swimming pools which are crystal clear and even turquoise in colour.

However as they’re on a path that few people hike, these waterfalls are often collectively referred to as Wales’ secret waterfalls.

Swimming here is exhilarating, and it’s one of our favourite places to go wild swimming in Wales. The waterfalls themselves are not visited often, so the landscape is not only beautiful but peaceful too.

You will reach the first waterfall after around 30 minutes from the start of the hike. You can see a map and more details of the trail here.

Aber Falls

This gorgeous 36 meter waterfall in Snowdonia is created by the merging of two falls – Rhaeadr Bach and Rhaeadr Fawr.  The result is quite spectacular.

To get here requires a pretty hike through Welsh meadow – lookout for birds and stoats en-route. The trail isn’t difficut and the views of the mountains you get as you hike makes the walk all the more special.

Swimming is possible in the plunge pool but water is cold even in summer. The rocks can be slippery, so be careful. To see a route of the trail to this incredible waterfall in Wales, see here.

Pistyll Rhaeadr

This is the tallest single-drop waterfall in the UK at 80 metres in height, and can be visited by making your way to the majestic Berwyn Mountains in Powys.

Surrounded by Welsh forest, this waterfall has featured in legend and mythology, and for generations people have visited Pistyll Rhaeadr for the tranquility and sense of peace you get here.

As one of the ‘seven wonders of Wales’ this waterfall is well worth visiting. It also transforms into an incredible frosty ice sculpture on very cold winter days.

There’s a small tearoom beside the bottom of the falls where you can get a coffee, tea, or bite to eat. It’s also possible to camp close to the waterfalls, and for a very affordable fee too.

Aberdulais Falls 

This waterfall is sometimes called the most scenic waterfall in Wales, and it’s easy to see why.

It’s almost wider than it is tall, but the best time to visit it is after heavy rain. That’s when the river turns into a torrent of water, and this cascade looks spectacular.

In fact the power of this waterfall was used to provide power for a tin mill for centuries, bringing prosperity to the rural region of Wales it sits in.

The old mill and waterfall are now part of a National Trust site, so you will have to pay a fee to visit. But for the photo opportunities of the falls and giant waterwheel alone, it’s worth it.

Dolgoch Falls

This series of three cascades in Snowdonia is quite a sight. The falls themselves are a combined 60 or so meters in height, and are set amongst a wooded rocky ravine full of rare mosses and ferns that furnish the rocks in green. It’s like taking a step back in time to the Jurassic Period.

You can choose a variety of options for walking to these falls, but our favourite one is a circular route covering all three.

Around the waterfall you’ll find a series of caves that go deep into the earth. They are from mining operations that happened decades earlier and aren’t safe to enter.

The trail to get to Dolgach Falls is short and easily accessible from the car park. You will pass many of the caves en route too. You can see a map of the walk here.

Swallow Falls

This waterfall is almost as wide as it is tall, providing spectacular photo opportunities in an ancient Welsh woodland setting. In fact it’s so photogenic that it has been featured in films, postcards and on TV!

The falls exist where the River Llugwy drops through a gorge. The result is what many locals regard as Wales’ and Snowdonia’s best waterfall.

You can swim in the plunge pool at this waterfall, but you better have confidence. There’s almost always people here so you will have spectators!

Sgwd yr Eira

This beautiful waterfall – which translates as ‘river of snow’ in Welsh – is set in the stunning Brecon Beacons. One of our favourite areas of the UK. (Related: Camping in the Brecon Beacons).

Sgwd yr Eira can be reached by a trail that, while steep in places, should be accessible for anyone with a good level of fitness.

The reward is the chance to take a dip in the pool below the waterfall and swim in some of the freshest water in Wales. You can also walk directly behind the waterfall.

If you have a few hours to spare, then this is one of four waterfalls in the ‘Four Waterfalls Walk’. That trail is around six miles in length and should take around 3-4 hours. You can see a detailed description of the walk here.

Dyserth Falls

Located near a village almost as beautiful as the falls itself, is Dyserth Waterfall, which drops 21 meters into a rocky chasm.

This waterfall is easy to access, as it can be reached from a short path that starts at the car park for the New Inn in Dyserth. From there, a trail leads up to the falls. Legend has it that the massive rock wall that the waterfall plunges down houses a giant!

If you’re feeling brave, there are steps that can take you up to the top so you have fantastic views across the village.

There are several woodland trails in and around the waterfall, while the historic village of Dyserth has some very nice pub and cafes. Perfect for a lunch or dinner stop! There’s some picnic tables at the bottom of the waterfall too.

Ffrwd Fawr Waterfalls

This magnificent 40 metre fall is on the Afon [River] Twymyn, and is often regarded as one of the most beautiful waterfalls in Wales. It’s dramatic and the landscape around it looks prehistoric. It’s true Welsh wilderness.

Yet despite being such a beautiful waterfall, it still remains relatively undisturbed as it’s not that easy to reach due to its remote location.

The trail isn’t difficult or particularly long, but it is used infrequently as it’s in rural Wales. However the effort of getting here is well worth it. You can see a description of the trail here.

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