This beautiful Mediterranean island may be small, but it packs a real punch. Stunning beaches and azure waters give way to ancient towns and cities inland, and that’s why camping in Malta is a popular holiday choice for many.

Below we share some of our favourite campsites in Malta, and give you some information about what sights and attractions are close to each. Then we look at wild camping in Malta, and then give information on what weather to expect when camping in the country.

But first, here’s a few fun facts about Malta:

  • Malta has ancient temples that are older than the Pyramids!
  • Movie scenes from Gladiator, World War Z and Captain Phillips were filmed in Malta.
  • The country is often voted as having some of the best diving spots in the world.
  • Malta has just one forest. Its name is Buskett, which comes from the word Boschetto which means ‘little forest’ in Italian!
  • Malta is one of the safest holiday destinations in Europe.

Camping in Malta

With almost all Maltese speaking English, this island is a hassle-free destination to navigate. It also has a rich culture, some stunning architecture due to centuries of being conquered, and beaches that are perfect for sunbathing and swimming.

Despite its small size, Malta also has some fantastic walks, so if you’re hoping to be active on your camping holiday then you won’t be disappointed. A good walking in Malta book – like this one – can help you plan what walks you want to do.

Campsites in Malta tend to be quite basic, so don’t expect swimming pools and on-site restaurants like you can find in western European campsites. Many are also run by local councils, and you have to apply for a permit to stay in them.

There are some very nice campsites to choose from that are located close to some of Malta’s famous historic sites, ancient landmarks and beaches – we give some of our favourites below.

Some of the best campsites in Malta

Għajn Tuffieħa Scout Campsite

This campsite, situated on Malta’s northwest coast, lies close to some of the best beaches in the country, making it a great base for a sunseeker. The facilities are good, and there’s private showers and toilets – that’s not always the case at Maltese campgrounds!

There’s a beach just five minutes walk away, and there’s a bus stop beside the campsite too. The Il-Majjistral Nature & History Park is in the same area as well, and is a national park home to endemic wildlife species and some fantastic coastal walks.

If you’re looking for a campsite in nature, with access to some great walking trails, but also beaches for sunbathing and swimming, this site may be perfect.

Campsite 3 – Ahrax tar-Ramel

Set on Mellieha Bay, this campsite’s name doesn’t exactly inspire, but the coastal views and sunsets you get here do. It’s also close to the island of Gozo – which makes it a perfect base for a day trip.

It’s very basic – like most Maltese campsites – with some toilets and showers, but it’s a perfect retreat into nature and is close to some great walks. Due to its rural setting there’s almost no light pollution at night which makes it perfect for stargazing.

Close by is Għadira Bay which is perfect for sunbathing and has some great restaurants, while Saint Agatha’s Tower – a stunning 400-year-old castle tower – is nearby too. Popeye Village, a spectacular village-sized movie set from the 1980s, is also just a few miles away.

The campsite is run by the local council, so you will have to email the council (the website is here), asking about a camping permit.

Tat-Tarġa Battery

For a very special place to camp, how about a 19th century artillery battery? That’s where this campsite, run by the Mosta local council, is based!

The campsite has decent facilities – showers, toilets, and even a communal kitchen – and the site is big so there’s ample space to pitch your tent and have privacy.

It’s very rural, but is a lovely place to enjoy a BBQ and watch the sunset. You will have to ask the local council for a permit to camp here, you can find the website here.

Zurrieq Scout Group Campsite

This campsite is run by a scout group that is based on Malta’s southern coast. They’ve upgraded their facilities recently to encourage more tourists, so there’s now private toilets and showers.

You can book online and the prices are highly affordable – from 6 Euros a person – and there’s even free wifi! The coastal views from the campsite are quite spectacular, while the actual site is large and feels very private. The staff were also kind and helpful.

The Wied Babu, a gorgeous valley, is very close, as are Malta’s famous stunning sea caves – the Blue Grotto.

Wild camping in Malta

Wild camping in Malta isn’t officially allowed. Although campers are allowed to pitch their tent if they have the permission of a landowner. Wild camping on beaches in Malta is also forbidden.

However as Malta is a popular country with amazing natural beauty, some outdoor enthusiasts do wild camp here. And free camping is sometimes tolerated by locals if you respect the land, camp far from buildings, and stick to the principles of leave no trace.

If you do want to wild camp in Malta, you may be asked by police what you are doing. The police tend to be polite, but will investigate any tents they see that are set up outside of campsites. If it’s late at night – and you’re quiet, in a small group, and not causing a nuisance – they will sometimes leave you be. However if they ask you to move, then don’t argue.

If you are planning to wild camp in Malta – and can’t be swayed to stay in a campsite instead – we’ve compiled the following guidelines to help keep you out of trouble and camp in a considerate manner:

  • You should camp in the same place for one night only, and pitch your tent discretely and in a remote place which will not be easily seen. Therefore don’t camp in or near settlements, someone’s farm or on cultivated land. If you think you’re on private land, always seek out the landowner and ask permission. They may request a small fee.
  • Campers should set up their tent at dusk, and take it down at dawn. A tent that is discreet, blends in with the landscape, and pitches quickly is best. Therefore a lightweight walking tent like this one would be a great investment for someone planning to wild camp in Malta.
  • If you are walking a trail you should camp away from the path as a matter of courtesy.
  • When wild camping in Malta, you should never make a campfire. For cooking, use a storm cooker. Our recommendation would be the Swedish brand Trangia, as their storm cookers are safe and virtually indestructible. Portable solar ovens, like this one by GoSun, are also a good fuel-less option.
  • Take any rubbish with you, and leave your camping spot exactly the way you found it.

Camping in Malta: The weather and what months to visit

Most visitors choose to come to Malta in summer, when daytime temperatures range around 20-32 Celsius. Rain is very rare during summer, and it’s a great season for coastal walks, sunbathing and swimming. It can get quite warm inside tents when camping, so make sure you choose a shady pitch.

Autumn and spring are cooler – ranging around 12-25 Celsius during the day depending on the month. Both seasons are great times to avoid the peak tourist season, tackle some of Malta’s best walking trails, and enjoy the island’s landmarks without a crowd.

Expect some of Europe’s mildest winter weather in Malta, with daytime temperatures ranging from 8-16 degrees Celsius during these months. The fresh air on walks during this season is enjoyable, although you can expect rain around seven days per month during winter.

Recommended for camping in Malta

*This article may contain affiliate links which allows Wandering our World to make a small commission on any sales made – and keep the coffee flowing! It involves no extra cost to yourself. As an Amazon Associate we earn from qualifying purchases, but only recommend products we believe in.