Have you ever arrived in a country, gone out to eat on that first night, and suddenly realized when the bill arrives, that you have no idea if you should tip or not?

That’s why we’ve put together this list, which we believe is one of the most comprehensive ones out there regarding tipping customs around the world.

Bookmark it and look it up whenever you need it – and you’ll always know what is expected so you can avoid any awkward situation.

The countries are listed below in alphabetical order and you can just use the search function shortcut on your keyboard or phone if you don’t want to scroll through the whole list.

A few general tips however:

  • We recommend leaving a tip as cash, so that a server will actually receive the money – and it doesn’t go into the pockets of restaurant owners.
  • Second, even if tipping is not the custom, it’s often nice to leave something anyway when you’ve received excellent service – it will almost always be appreciated although do check with the list to make sure you wont offend.
  • Lastly, in particularly poor countries, tourists leaving large tips can have a huge impact – be wise with how you tip.
Tipping countries around the world

Tipping in Afghanistan:

Tipping is not expected, and restaurants shouldn’t add any service charges to bills. However a small tip is welcomed.

Tipping in Albania:

A tip is not compulsory, but if you experience good service a tip will be gratefully received. Most often it is polite to round up a bill, allowing a little to be left for service staff.

Tipping in Algeria:

Tipping is not expected and not the norm, however wages in the service sector are low so a tip of 10% for good service is appreciated.

Tipping in Andorra:

Tipping is optional, but a 5-10% tip is often expected for good service.

Tipping in Antigua and Barbuda:

A service charge is usually included, so tipping is optional. A small tip of 5-10% is appreciated for great service.

Tipping in Argentina:

Tipping is expected in Argentina for good service, with 5-10% the norm. No need to over tip, and no need to tip at all if service was bad.

Tipping in Armenia:

Tipping is not the historical norm here, although in Yerevan it is becoming more common. 10% for great service is welcomed, or feel free to leave the change, or round up a bill or taxi fare.

Tipping in Australia:

Tipping isn’t usually expected but is becoming the norm, although there is usually a10% service charges added to bills. It’s normal to tell someone to keep the change, but no need to tip more.

Tipping in Aruba:

There is usually a 15% service charge added to bills so need to tip unless the service received was above and beyond.

Tipping in Austria:

Service charges are usually included in restaurant bills so no need to tip, although rounding up the bill, or leaving the change is expected if service was good.

Tipping in Azerbaijan:

Tipping is unusual, and may be seen as bizarre outside of the capital.

Tipping in the Bahamas:

Tipping is expected here, with 10-15% the norm, while hotel maids usually expect a dollar or two left for them per hotel night stayed.

Tipping in Bahrain:

Service charges are usually included, however a tip of 5-10% will be welcomed.

Tipping in Bangladesh:

It is not mandatory to leave a tip, although letting a waiter, or taxi driver keep the change, or leaving a 5% tip will be welcomed.

Tipping in Barbados:

Service charges will usually be included at restaurants and hotels, so no extra tip is expected. You may leave a 10% tip if receiving extraordinary service however. Hotel maids usually expect a tip of a dollar or two per day.

Tipping in Belarus:

Unlike much of Europe, tipping is not common in Belarus, although rounding up a bill can be a nice thing to do for service staff. Tipping 10% for great service is not unusual however.

Tipping in Belgium:

Service charges are included so tipping is not needed, however a small tip of 5/10% will probably be expected in tourist hot-spots.

Tipping in Belize:

Tipping is expected in Belize, in both bars and restaurants. 10-15% is average, while 20% can be given for outstanding service.

Tipping in Benin:

While some people may be happy for a tip after good service or helping out a tourist, others may take offense. Read the situation as best as possible and apply logic.

Tipping in Bhutan:

Tipping is not the historical norm, while service charges are usually included. Feel free to let someone keep the change, or round up a ill.

Tipping in Bolivia:

Tipping is not compulsory, but small tips for helping out tourists may be expected.

Tipping in Bosnia and Herzegovina:

Tips for good service will be gratefully received – expect to give 10-15%. But tipping is not mandatory.

Tipping in Botswana:

Tipping isn’t expected but will be happily received for good service. 10% is about right.

Tipping in Brazil:

Tipping is not expected, although telling someone such as a taxi driver to keep the change is normal.

Tipping in Brunei:

Tips are not common or expected in Brunei, although porters may expect a small tip.

Tipping in Bulgaria:

Serving staff get paid very little and tipping is customary – a 10% tip is normal.

Tipping in Burkina Faso:

Tipping is not expected is most places, although establishments used to tourists may expect a small tip.

Tipping in Burma:

Tipping is not compulsory but greatly welcomed. 5-10% is a good amount in a restaurant. For taxi drivers, rounding up a bill, or letting them keep the change, is advised.

Tipping in Cambodia:

A dollar or two is the norm and will be expected as a tip throughout the country, but leaving no tip will not land you in trouble.

Tipping in Cameroon:

Tipping is customary in the country, with a tip of 10% for good service the norm in restaurants. A few dollars extra for a guide or porters per day is also expected.

Tipping in Canada:

Tipping is expected, with 15-20% the norm for good service.

Tipping in Cape Verde:

Waiting staff are paid very little and tips will be gratefully received. 5-10% is normal.

Tipping in Chad:

Tips are welcomed in restaurants for good service (10%), and feel free to round up taxi fares.

Tipping in Chile:

Most places add a service charge of 10% so there is no need to tip extra unless service was especially good. If no service charge is included on the bill, 10% is normal.

Tipping in China:

Tipping is not customary in China –a lthough in the case of tour guides and tour bus drivers, they’re paid so little by employers that tips can be an important source of income.

Tipping in Colombia:

Small tips are common (2-5%), while in up-market restaurants a tip of 10% will be expected.

Tipping in the Comoros:

In general tipping is not expected.

Tipping in Costa Rica:

Service charges are added to bills so Costa Ricans do not tip. If you wish to tip extra for good service, 5-10% will do.

Tipping in Croatia:

Tipping is expected in Croatia, with 10% the norm  – even if service charges are included.

Tipping in Cuba:

Leaving small change as tips for housekeeping, taxi drivers, and waiters is acceptable.

Tipping in Curacao:

Tipping waiting staff and taxi drivers 15% is the norm, although some bills may include charges already and in that case you do not need to add a tip.

Tipping in Cyprus:

Leaving a tip is up to you, although 5-10% is appreciated. Some places include a service charge and therefore there is no need to add any extra.

Tipping in the Czech Republic:

In touristy areas a tip of 10% is expected, whereas in less tourist hot spots, nearer 5% is acceptable.

Tipping in Denmark:

Tipping isn’t expected in Denmark as service charges are included, however some people tip anyway. While waiting staff are usually paid well, other professions (such as guides) are often not, and tips are appreciated.

Tipping in Djibouti:

Tipping is customary with 10% the norm.

Tipping in Dominica:

10% is the norm across sectors, including bars, restaurants, and even barbers.

Tipping in the Dominican Republic:

Leaving a tip of a dollar or two to service staff (waiters, barmen, hotel staff) is welcomed, and usually expected of tourists.

Tipping in Ecuador:

Service charges are usually included in restaurant bills and therefore no extra is needed. If a service charge is not included, 5-10% is normal.

Tipping in Egypt:

In big cities many people will expect small tips for everything, including directions on the street – and some may be very pushy about it. Taxi drivers will expect a small tip, and at restaurants you’ll be expected to tip 10%.

Tipping in El Salvador:

A service charge is usually added to restaurant bills, and no extra is expected. If no service charge, add 5-10%. Taxi drivers don’t expect tips, but will appreciate if they can keep the change.

Tipping in Equatorial Guinea:

Tipping is not customary, however in restaurants and bars used by expats staff have come to expect tips.

Tipping in Estonia:

Service charges are not included in bills and tips are optional. Leaving a 10% tip for great service is normal however.

Tipping in Ethiopia:

Tipping is not common in Ethiopia and when done it’s usually only small amounts. Staff may expect a tip in tourist areas (5-10%), whereas it will be far less expected in less touristy areas and restaurants, although leaving a little will be appreciated.

Tipping in Fiji:

Tipping is not expected; however if service has been good, a tip is appreciated. Many resorts have “Christmas funds” which tourists who have received good service can contribute towards – those funds are disputed to staff at the end of the year.

Tipping in France:

Tipping is normal, with a couple of euros at a café being expected, and more like 5-10% at a restaurant.

Tipping in French Polynesia:

Tipping is not expected. You can tip for really amazing service, but be warned some people may not accept. A few restaurants will have a note on menus saying whether tips are welcome or not.

Tipping in Finland:

Tips are not expected and service charges are usually included in bills. If you wish to leave a tip, 5-10% is normal, however some people may not accept a tip at all and find it awkward.

Tipping in Gabon:

Tipping is not part of the culture, and has only recently started happening in tourist areas of the country. Rounding up a bill or taxi fare is good practice, or if service has been very good, 5-10% would be welcomed.

Tipping in Gambia:

Tipping is not expected and no one will judge you for not leaving one. However staff are low paid and a tip of 5-10% would be welcomed for good service.

Tipping in Georgia:

Tips (10-15%) are expected in trendy restaurants in the large cities or popular expat spots, however in rural areas and smaller towns tips are not expected.

Tipping in Germany:

Tips are customary in Germany, with 5-10% of the final bill being the norm.

Tipping in Ghana:

Small tips from leaving change, or rounding up a bill are appreciated, although not expected. Tip such as 5-10% of a bill are expected in the tourist areas or expat hangout spots, although not compulsory.

Tipping in Greece:

Tipping 5-10% in restaurants is normal, but check the bill doesn’t include a service charge already. If it does, you don’t need to tip.

Tipping in Grenada:

Service charges are usually added to the bill, however if there isn’t one a top of 10% is normal. Choosing not to tip is also fine.

Tipping in Guatemala:

It is not obligatory to tip, but if service has been good 10-15% is a welcome reward.

Tipping in Guinea:

Tipping is not expected but gratefully received. Unlike other countries, a tip is not expected to be a percentage of the bill, rather it’s custom to leave what you can – 10% however is a good marker.

Tipping in Guyana:

Tipping is expected in the capital, but not so much rural areas. 10% is normal, and 15-20% for excellent service. Taxi drivers, hotel staff, and waiting staff all expect tips.

Tipping in Haiti:

Tipping is not customary however a tip of 10% is usually expected for tourists in tourist areas.

Tipping in Honduras:

A service charge is usually added to a bill, however if not, an extra 10-15% is normal and will be appreciated.  Even if a service charge is included an extra tip is appreciated as service staff are paid very little.

Tipping in Hong Kong:

Tipping is not expected and could be seen as rude. Many restaurants will, however, have a service charge included in the bill.

Tipping in Hungary:

A service charge is sometimes included, if not it is customary to tip – 10% is the norm.

Tipping in Iceland:

Most restaurants include a service charge in the bill, if not a 10% tip is normal and would be expected.

Tipping in India:

Tipping is not compulsory but will be gratefully received. Tips should not be over the top as this could offend – at most tip 10-15% of the bill. You may tip other service staff for a job well done with small change.

Tipping in Indonesia:

Tipping is not included but 5-10% of the bill would be received well. Some places may add a service charge anyway – check the bill.

Tipping in Iran:

Leaving a tip is not expected, however in main cities or expat hotspots 5-10% for good service would be received well.  In rural areas there’s no expectation to tip.

Tipping in Iraq:

Tipping is not expected but would be appreciated. Leaving some small change, or 5-10% of the bill is enough.

Tipping in Ireland:

Tipping is not compulsory but in general is done. 10% is the norm.

Tipping in Israel:

Most Israelis tip restaurant staff and tourists will be expected to as well – 10-15% would be considered a normal amount.

Tipping in Italy

A service charge is often added to the bill and so there is no need to tip. However if you’re unsure, or there is no service charge, feel free to tip a few euros or 5-10% of the bill. There is no expectation however to do this, unless at an upmarket restaurant.

Tipping in the Ivory Coast:

A service charge is usually added to restaurant and hotel bills, however if one isn’t, 10-15% is gratefully received.

Tipping in Jamaica:

Tipping is not compulsory but often expected. Bar staff, hotel staff, and restaurant staff are all usually tipped. One to two dollars is normal, while 10% of a restaurant bill is a good guideline – 5% if extra charges are already added on.

Tipping in Japan:

Tips are not customary and tipping can be seen as rude.

Tipping in Jordan:

Service charges are usually added to a restaurant bill, however there’s debate how often a server actually receives that money. Best to leave a 5-10% tip regardless of whether there is a service charge added or not.

Tipping in Kazakhstan:

Tipping is not expected, although in areas frequented by tourists and expats it is becoming more common.

Tipping in Kenya:

Sometimes service charges are included – if not, a 5% tip is normal, and a 10% tip for great service.

Tipping in Kiribati:

Leaving a tip is not part of Kiribati culture.

Tipping in Kosovo:

Tipping is not part of Kosovo culture, however it is welcomed. Small tips, such as rounding up a bill or leaving small change, is more than acceptable.

Tipping in Kuwait:

Service charges are usually included, and tips are not expected, however small tips are welcomed by all in the service industry

Tipping in Kyrgyzstan:

It may not be asked for but in the tourism sector, guides and drivers will expect a tip. In city restaurants a tip won’t be expected but will be appreciated (5-10%), in rural areas a tip is even less heard of.

Tipping in Laos:

Tipping is not expected. If service has been good, 5-10% will be gratefully received.

Tipping in Latvia:

Customers are not required to leave a tip, or expected, although tips are welcomed, especially in Riga.

Tipping in Lebanon:

10-15% of a restaurant bill is normal, although make sure service charges are not included to begin with. Porters, taxi drivers, and other employees in the service sector expect a tip for a job well done – some small change will suffice.

Tipping in Lesotho:

In the cities it’s expected to tip 10-15% of the bill. In rural areas it is common practice to round the bill up rather than tip according to a percentage.

Tipping in Liberia:

If there is no service charge added to a bill then it is polite to add a 10% tip.

Tipping in Libya:

In large cities tips are now expected with 10-15% the norm. In towns and rural areas, tipping is not expected but rounding up the bill may be seen a polite gesture

Tipping in Liechtenstein:

Tipping is not compulsory but is appreciated (5-10%).

Tipping in Lithuania:

Tipping is expected with 5-15% the norm. A 5% service charge is sometimes already included.

Tipping in Luxembourg:

A service charge will usually be added to the bill. No additional tip is necessary although some people will add an extra euro or two.

Tipping in Macau:

Tipping is not customary and therefore not expected, although it’s becoming more normal. A service charge will sometimes be included in bills. Small tips will be appreciated though.

Tipping in Macedonia:

Tipping isn’t expected but is practiced in major cities where 10% is appreciated. In rural areas, tipping is very uncommon. Locals don’t usually tip.

Tipping in Madagascar:

It is very unusual for locals to tip, however it is expected from tourists. 5-10% is fine.

Tipping in Malawi:

Tipping is not expected, but in the larger cities if service has been good tipping 10% will be appreciated.

Tipping in Malaysia:

Tipping is uncommon here and you will not be judged for leaving your table without giving a tip. However if you wish to leave a tip it will be happily received. Some restaurants add a service charge to bills.

Tipping in the Maldives:

Tipping is not compulsory but with low waged service staff, tips will be gratefully received.  Service charges are commonly added to bills, but staff may not always receive them.

Tipping in Mali:

Tipping is not required in Mali, but small tips are expected if a job has been done well.

Tipping in Malta:

Tipping is the norm in Malta and a tip of 5-10% of the bill is expected if a restaurant has not already added a service charge.

Tipping in the Marshall Islands:

Tips are not expected and would be unusual in very rural or local establishments – in more touristy areas and city restaurants, a 5-10% tip would be half-expected for good service.

Tipping in Mauritania:

If no service charge has been added to the bill, a tip of 10-15% would generally be expected.

Tipping in Mauritius:

Tips are not expected but will be welcomed. Service staff in Mauritius know that a tip should be earned and not be expected, and so will go out of their way to give great service. 10-15% in a restaurant is about right.

Tipping in Mexico:

If a service charge is not included, a tip will be expected – about 10-15%.

Tipping in Moldova:

Tips are generally accepted, with 5-10% being the norm.

Tipping in Mongolia:

Tips are not expected in Mongolia, and staff will think you have left money by mistake if you leave one on the table. At the very up-market restaurants aimed at tourists, tips will be welcomed however.

Tipping in Montenegro:

In general tips will be expected in major cities, with 10-15% the norm. Taxi drivers wont expect tips, but rounding up a fare would be normal.

Tipping in Morocco:

In tourist areas a tip of 10% would usually be expected. In more rural areas, just leaving some spare change or rounding up the bill would be polite.

Tipping in Mozambique:

Tipping is part of the culture and will be expected. 10% of the bill is the norm.

Tipping in Namibia:

Tipping is not compulsory, but gratefully received. Tipping small change, or 10% of the bill is polite.

Tipping in Nepal:

If a service change isn’t included, a tip of 10-15% is good. In rural areas tipping is not practiced and may come across as strange behavior. Hotel staff will probably expect a tip for carrying luggage.

Tipping in New Zealand:

Tipping is not customary but a 10% tip for good service is welcomed, especially as service jobs are not well paid in the country.

Tipping in Nicaragua:

A tip of 10% is expected for good service, 15-20% for exceptional service.

Tipping in Nigeria:

Tipping is not common in Nigeria but is welcomed. A 10% tip at a restaurant frequented by expats, or a small tip for hotel staff that carry your luggage would be polite and expected.

Tipping in Norway:

Tipping is not compulsory but many locals do it. 10-15% is usual for good service.

Tipping in Oman:

Tipping is not part of Oman culture historically, but is becoming more common. In tourist restaurants, a 10% tip is normal.

Tipping in Pakistan:

Service charges are often added at up-market restaurants so tipping is not needed here. At more local places, feel free to round up the bill or leave some small change when you leave.

Tipping in Palestine:

A tip is not expected in Palestine but will be welcomed. 5-15% depending on service is appropriate.

Tipping in Panama:

Leaving 10% is normal, although sometimes service charges are included. If that’s the case feel free to round up the bill or leave some small change.

Tipping in Papua New Guinea:

Tips are not expected and are very rare. Tips will be appreciated if given, but it may be worth giving directly to a server and pointing out that it’s for good service.

Tipping in Paraguay:

A tip is expected in restaurants that are used to tourists – 10% is appropriate.

Tipping in Peru:

A 10% tip is expected at up-market restaurants, even if a service charge has been added. At less fancy restaurants, rounding a bill or leaving some small change is appropriate but not expected.

Tipping in Philippines:

Tipping is not compulsory, but if service has been good then tipping 10-15% is expected.

Tipping in Poland:

Tipping is expected with 10% being the norm and 15-20% for superb service.

Tipping in Portugal:

Tipping is the norm, with 10% appropriate. Tipping 5% is also seen as OK.

Tipping in Qatar:

Service charges are included in most bills but tipping a little extra will often be appreciated.

Tipping in Romania:

Tipping is standard, with 5-10% the norm. 15% for exceptional service.

Tipping in Russia:

Tipping is expected with 10-15% the normal amount.

Tipping in Rwanda:

Tipping is not compulsory in Rwanda and would be regarded as unusual in anywhere other than the capital and up-market restaurants and tourist hot-spots.

Tipping in Saint Kitts and Nevis:

If a service charge hasn’t been included, a tip of 10-15% will be expected.

Tipping in St. Lucia:

Tipping is up to a tourist’s discretion and is not compulsory, although the norm if tipping is around 10-15%.

Tipping in Saint Vincent and the Grenadines:

Tipping is not compulsory but is expected for good service – 10-15% is appropriate.

Tipping in Samoa:

Tipping is not expected in Samoa and locals don’t tip. However leaving a small tip will be greatly appreciated.

Tipping in San Marino:

A tip is generally expected if there is no service charge added to the bill – 10% is good

Tipping in Sao Tome and Principe:

Tipping is not compulsory, but a small tip will be greatly appreciated.

Tipping in Saudi Arabia:

If there is no service charge, then a 10% tip is usually expected for good service.

Tipping in Senegal:

Tipping is not a thing in Senegalese culture, however tips are usually expected from tourists in the main cities and on tours. Elsewhere tips won’t be expected.

Tipping in Serbia:

Tipping is not compulsory but will be expected for good service – 10-15% is normal.

Tipping in the Seychelles:

Tipping is not expected but rounding up a bill or taxi fare will be appreciated.

Tipping in Sierra Leone:

Tipping is not expected, but will be welcomed. Consider 5-10% in restaurants.

Tipping in Singapore:

In general tipping isn’t expected. Some restaurants will add a service charge however. If they don’t and you want to tip, 5-10% is appropriate.

Tipping in Slovakia:

Tipping is common in large cities, where 10% is appropriate.

Tipping in Slovenia:

Tips are not compulsory but are greatly appreciated. Consider 10% for good service, and up to 15-20% for exceptional service.

Tipping in the Solomon Islands:

In general tipping is not expected, although if you do wish to leave a tip for good service it will be received well. Unlike other countries, a tip doesn’t need to be a percentage of a bill, but could just be spare change.

Tipping in South Africa:

Tips are expected for good service, with 10-15% being the norm.

Tipping in South Korea:

Tipping is not expected, however service charge may be included in some of the nicer restaurants and hotels.

Tipping in Spain:

Tipping is expected from coffee houses to restaurants. 10% is a good amount for dinner, but for a café leaving a little spare change or rounding up a bill is sufficient – that’s what most locals will do.

Tipping in Sri Lanka:

Locals don’t tip so tipping is not expected, however there is some expectation that tourists tip when good service is received. 10% would be welcomed.

Tipping in Suriname:

Tipping is not part of Suriname culture so won’t be expected.  Restaurants sometimes add a service charge – if they don’t, leaving some spare change, or rounding up a bill will always be appreciated.

Tipping in Switzerland:

Swiss law says all charges must be included in published prices, so tips are not expected as service charges will be included in all bills. However tips are still appreciated.

Tipping in Sweden:

A service charge is usually included. If not, a tip of between 5-15% is acceptable depending on the service received.

Tipping in Taiwan:

Tipping is not expected, and restaurants will usually add a service charge to bills.

Tipping in Tajikistan:

In big cities and tourist hot spots tipping might be expected (5-10%), in towns and rural areas there is no need to tip.

Tipping in Tanzania:

Tipping has come to be expected from tourists, around 10% is normal.

Tipping in Thailand:

Tipping is not expected but any small change for porters, waiters, hotel staff and taxi drivers will be gladly received. 5-10% at a restaurant would be polite.

Tipping in Tonga:

Tipping is optional in Tonga, however a small tip to show gratitude when good service is received is expected.

Tipping in Trinidad and Tobago:

Locals don’t usually tip, but tourists are expected to tip for good service. 10-15% is the norm.

Tipping in Tunisia:

Tips are not compulsory but are often expected of tourists in large cities and tourist areas and hotels – 10% is the norm. Outside of big cities tipping is more unusual.

Tipping in Turkey:

Tips are expected, with 5-10% the norm in restaurants. Taxi drivers do not need to be tipped, but rounding up a fare is seen as polite.

Tipping in Turkmenistan:

Tipping is not expected, but if service has been good then a tip will be appreciated. In rural areas however, tipping may be seen as unusual, so there’s no need to.

Tipping in Uganda:

A tip is not an obligation in Uganda, although tipping 5% for good service is seen as a nice thing to do.

Tipping in Ukraine:

Tipping is not customary but is expected of tourists in the big cities – 10% is a fine amount. In smaller cities and rural areas tips are not expected of anyone.

Tipping in the United Arab Emirates:

Tipping is expected even when service charges have been included on a bill. 10-15% is the norm.

Tipping in the United Kingdom:

It’s customary to tip, although if a service charge has been added to a bill you don’t need to (although rounding the bill up is a nice gesture). 10-15% is the norm, 20% if service was outstanding.

Tipping in the United States:

Tipping is seen as compulsory, with an expectation of 15-20% for service, and higher for exceptional service.

Tipping in Uruguay:

Tipping is not expected but appreciated. 10% of a restaurant bill is the norm. Tipping other service staff with small change after for a good job, such as hotel staff or gas attendants, is also welcomed.

Tipping in Uzbekistan:

Tipping is not in local custom and will not be expected, the exception being up-market restaurants (10-15%). Some restaurants will add a service charge. Leaving some small change, or rounding a bill up could be polite after good service however.

Tipping in Vanuatu:

Tipping is not expected, even in posh restaurants. It goes against local culture and custom.

Tipping in Venezuela:

Tipping is not compulsory but is welcomed. Service charges are usually added to bills but tipping an extra 5-10% for good service is common.

Tipping in Vietnam:

Tipping is not expected and in general not carried out by locals. However if you receive good service a tip of 10% will be gratefully received.

Tipping in Zambia:

Tipping is not expected, although you may tip if you wish. Service charges are sometimes added anyway.

Tipping in Zimbabwe:

Tipping is not expected but will be gratefully received. 10-15% for good service is reasonable.